Historic Churchill Fellowship awards look to future

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The latest Churchill Fellowship awards have given two Kingborough women an exciting chance to travel the globe and further their experience and knowledge for the betterment of themselves and their community.

Leah Galvin has been granted her fellowship to explore business and government approaches which have increase local food procurement in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, the USA and Canada.

Ms Galvin, who is the State Manager for Eat Well Tasmania, describes it as an absolute thrill and humbling to be awarded the competitive fellowship.

During the trip, Ms Galvin will be speaking to experienced experts to find out exactly what has worked and what hasn’t and hopes that her research can result in more local food being available for larger institutions in Tasmania such as hospitals and aged care instead of having a focus on exports.

“If you really want to have a big impact, you have to look to make a big change,” said Ms Galvin.

Kristy Lark-Booth will be travelling to the USA, Italy, France and the UK to enable her to establish Physic and Apothecary gardens specifically for distillation, education and tourism.

Ms Booth will be expanding on 20 years of distilling knowledge to develop the specialised, educational garden for Australian conditions and aims to soak up as much information as possible during the trip including the significance of layouts and which botanicals are best to plant and use for distilling.

“It is a fantastic opportunity and I am very grateful to the Churchill Trust that they have given me the chance to go overseas and learn about a topic I am passionate about,” said Ms Booth.

This year, the life-changing opportunity has been awarded to 115 Australians, including ten Tasmanians, allowing them to meet and work with leaders of influence to gain and exchange knowledge, skills and experience in areas from predator reduction in farming, para-athlete training techniques, Italian baking and ways to engage isolated people in the community through local theatre.

“Churchill Fellowships recognise people with passion and drive, providing an unrivalled opportunity and freedom for people to experience world’s best practice on issues that matter to Australian communities,” said CEO of the Churchill Trust, Mr Adam Davey.

It is 54 years since the first Churchill Fellowships were awarded in honour of Sir Winston Churchill, however the projects that will be aided by his legacy are still, as he intended, firmly focussed on the future.

“While the award we offer may be steeped in history, we are proud that it still remains extraordinarily relevant,” said Mr Davey.

“Churchill Fellows are up for a challenge, they are people who can foresee an opportunity, know how to address it and will use this experience to work with and learn from their international peers and some outstanding thought leaders.

“Each and every one of the 115 Churchill Fellows will return to Australia armed with the practical knowledge and experience needed to advance their projects and create new opportunities in Australia.”

Pictured above: Leah Galvin has been granted her fellowship to explore business and government approaches which have increase local food procurement in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, the USA and Canada.

Pictured above: Kristy Lark-Booth will be travelling to the USA, Italy, France and the UK to enable her to establish Physic and Apothecary gardens specifically for distillation, education and tourism.


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